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Lead Terms

Glossary of Terms

Abatement
Any activity that gets rid of lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards. The four types of abatement methods are removal, enclosure, encapsulation, and replacement.
Anticipatory guidance
Information that is given to a parent or guardian to help reduce a child's risk of exposure to lead and to prevent childhood lead poisoning. A health care professional usually provides this information.
Blood lead level (BLL)
A measurement of how much lead is in the blood.
Capillary blood test
A test for which blood is obtained by pricking the skin of the finger, heel, or other areas (capillary blood). A drop (or a few drops) of blood is put on a test strip or into a small container.
Chelation therapy
The drug treatment given to someone that has very high lead levels.
Home investigation (environmental investigation)
An investigation done by certified people who try to locate sources of lead in the home, buildings, or other structures. Sometimes dust and paint chip samples are gathered and sent to a lab for testing. When the results come back, the homeowner is given a detailed report of the findings and recommendations on ways to get rid of lead hazards.
Lead Inspector
A person who has completed training from an EPA approved program and has been licensed or certified by the proper local, tribal, state or Federal agency to perform a lead-based inspection.
Lead Inspection
An on-site investigation to detect if lead-based paint is present in a home and where it's found. This investigation does not provide information on whether it's a hazard or how to take care of it.
Lead-based paint
Any paint, varnish, shellac, or other coating that contains lead equal to or greater to 1.0 milligram per square centimeter or 0.5 percent lead by weight.
Lead hazard
Unsafe conditions that cause lead exposure at levels that could be harmful to a person.
Lead hazard control
Activities to control and get rid of lead hazards. They include short-term controls and abatement.
Lead risk assessment
An on-site investigation to detect if lead hazards are present and how they can be controlled.
Lead risk assessor
A person who has completed training with an accredited training program and has been certified by the proper local, tribal, state, and Federal agency to perform a risk assessment.
Pica
The compulsive eating of nonnutritive items such as dirt or flaking paint.
Title X (Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992)
This law directs Federal agencies to create regulations to strengthen and redirect national lead poisoning prevention efforts.
ug/dL
Micrograms per deciliter; the measurement used to express how much lead is in someone's blood.
Venous blood test
A test for which blood is drawn from a vein, usually in the arm. This is the ONLY way to know for sure if a child has lead poisoning.
XRF machine
A devise used to detect sources of lead in the home. The machine uses X-ray technology and must be used with care by a certified professional to prevent exposure to harmful radiation.