Georgia Meets the Highest National Data Quality for Cancer Registry

September 8, 2014

Cancer is a notifiable disease in Georgia. The Georgia Department of Public Health’s (DPH) Comprehensive Cancer Registry (GCCR) collects data about all newly-diagnosed cancer cases among Georgia residents and submits these data each year to the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, Inc. (NAACCR). The Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry (GCCR) has, for the 1lth consecutive year, attained the NAACCR’s GOLD standard for data quality, completeness, and timeliness.

NAACCR is a professional organization that develops and promotes uniform data standards for cancer registries and promotes the use of cancer surveillance data to ultimately reduce the burden of cancer in North America. To achieve the GOLD standard designation, NAACCR reviewed 2011 GCCR data and deemed that they were of sufficiently high quality to be able to calculate cancer incidence rates by county, sex, age, and race in Georgia. In addition to the GOLD standard, the 2011 GCCR data also exceeded the CDC’s National Data Quality Standards and will be included in the U.S. Cancer Statistics Registry.

“The GOLD Standard achievement is phenomenal,” said Cherie Drenzek, DVM, MS, State Epidemiologist. “The dedicated GCCR staff provides excellent cancer registry data, and deserves national recognition for reaching this milestone. Attaining the Gold Certification for 11 years represents a high level of commitment to deliver the best in Georgia and public health.”

To achieve GOLD certification in 2011, the GCCR data has met strict guidelines and criteria to attain 100 percent in completeness.

“Over the years, GCCR has consistently received high ratings in the 95th percentile or higher for completeness and 100 percent for error-free data along with other key variables,” said J. Patrick O’Neal, M.D., director of Health Protection for DPH. “This is remarkable work by a dedicated staff of professionals.”

To view GCCR’s Gold Standard certifications, visit http://dph.georgia.gov/reporting-cancer

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