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Measles

Measles, also called Rubeola, is a highly contagious viral disease. The disease is no longer common in the United States, however it is widespread in many parts of the world including Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Measles begins with a fever that lasts for a couple of days, followed by a cough, runny nose, and conjunctivitis (pink eye). These symptoms are followed by a maculopapular rash that begins at the hairline, moves to the face and upper neck and then down the body.  Infected people are usually contagious from about 4 days before their rash starts to 4 days afterwards.

 

Measles Basics

Measles Information for Healthcare Professionals

Measles Information for Schools and Childcare

Measles Statistics

 

Measles (Rubeola) Basics

General information about measles including disease description, complications, treatment and prevention.

  • Measles (Rubeola)
    Fact sheet with general information about measles, including symptoms, complications, tests, vaccination and treatment.
  • About Measles
    General information from the CDC about measles, including transmission, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. Also includes photos and kid-friendly fact sheet.

Reporting

  • Reporting Measles
    All suspect cases of measles should be reported to the Georgia Department of Public Health immediately. Find out more about what needs to be reported, who needs to report diseases, which forms to use and where to find out more about the disease.

Vaccine Information

 

 

Measles Information for Health Professionals

Clinical Features and Epidemiology

  • Measles Basics
    General information about measles including disease description, complications, treatment and prevention.

Measles Laboratory Testing

  • Measles Specimen Collection and Submission Guidelines
    Suspect cases of measles infection can be confirmed by serologic testing, culture, and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Maximum sensitivity and specificity are achieved when serologic tests, culture and PCR are performed.

Reporting

  • Reporting Measles
    All suspect cases of measles should be reported to the Georgia Department of Public Health immediately. Find out more about what needs to be reported, who needs to report diseases, which forms to use and where to find out more about the disease.

Vaccine Information

 

 

Measles Information for Schools and Child Care

Information for reporting and handling measles case-patients and outbreaks for school health personnel and child care settings.

Reporting

  • Reporting Measles
    All suspect cases of measles should be reported to the Georgia Department of Public Health immediately. Find out more about what needs to be reported, who needs to report diseases, which forms to use and where to find out more about the disease.

 

Measles Statistics

2011