Before, During and After a Hurricane

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. The areas covered include the North Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.

Before a Hurricane

As a coastal state, Georgia is at risk for hurricanes that form in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Hurricanes can cause catastrophic damage even hundreds of miles inland, so every resident needs to understand their risks and should plan what to do in the event of an evacuation.

Stay Informed

It's important that you stay informed before, during and after a hurricane. So, you need to know what warning systems and information resources are available to you.

  • Radio and TV stations
  • Social Media
  • NOAA weather radios
  • Internet
  • Cell phone emergency text alerts
  • Smart Phone Hurricane and Weather Alert applications
  • Local emergency officials or police

The following links provide up-to-date information for Georgia:

Make a Communications Plan

Your family may not be together when disaster strikes. Make a plan today. Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find.

http://ready.ga.gov/make-a-plan/

Prepare a Ready Kit

To prepare for the unknown, each home should have a 72-hour Disaster Survival Kit. You will need to pack some essential items to help you and your family survive, whether you stay at home or leave it during a disaster. Ensure at least three days (72 hours) supply for each person. Do not forget pets where applicable.

http://ready.ga.gov/build-a-kit/

During a Hurricane

For anyone staying at home during a hurricane there are important safety tips that are key to surviving an intense storm.

  • If a hurricane is likely in your area, you should:
  • Listen to the radio or TV or download the Ready Georgia app.
  • Secure your home, close storm shutters and secure outdoor objects or bring them indoors.
  • Turn off utilities if instructed to do so. Otherwise, turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting and keep its doors closed.
  • Learn how to keep food safe in an emergency.
  • Turn off propane tanks.
  • Avoid using the phone, except for serious emergencies.
  • Moor your boat if time permits.
  • Have a supply of water for sanitary purposes such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other larger containers with water.
  • Never use a generator inside your home or garage, even if doors and windows are open. Only use generators outside, more than 20 feet away from your home, doors, and windows.

After a Hurricane

After a hurricane, you may face flooding, downed power lines, damage from mold, and other risks to your health.

  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information about what is happening and what you should do. However, you should listen to NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
  • Stay out of flood waters, if possible. The water may be contaminated or electrically charged. However, should you find yourself trapped in your vehicle in rising water get out immediately and seek higher ground.
  • Be alert for tornadoes and flooding. If you see a funnel cloud or if local authorities issue a tornado warning take shelter underground or in an interior room away from windows. If waters are rising quickly or local authorities issue a flood or flash flood warning, seek higher ground.
  • Stay away from downed power lines to avoid the risk of electric shock or electrocution.
  • Do not return to your home until local authorities say it is safe. Even after the hurricane and after flood waters recede, roads may be weakened and could collapse. Buildings may be unstable, and drinking water may be contaminated. Use common sense and exercise caution.

https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/be-safe-after.html

Publications

Official Georgia Hurricane Guide

Other Useful Websites