Perinatal Hepatitis C


Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) can be transmitted from an infected mother to her infant at birth. HCV-exposed infants have a 4% to 7% risk of developing infection; the risk of infection increases if the mother is co-infected with HIV. There is no prophylaxis to prevent infection. 

All children born to HCV-infected women should be tested for HCV infection. Testing is recommended using an antibody-based test after 18 months of age. Testing with an HCV RNA assay can be considered in the first year of life. Although the optimal timing of such a test is unknown, HCV RNA testing is not recommended before 2 months of age.

Please click on the following links to find audience specific materials about perinatal hepatitis C:

Information for Pregnant Women and Mothers

Information for Prenatal Care Providers

Information for Pediatric Providers

Additional Resources
 


Contact the Georgia Viral Hepatitis Program:

Georgia Department of Public Health
2 Peachtree Street NW, 14thFloor
Atlanta, GA 30303
Phone: (404) 657-2588
Fax:  (404) 657-2608

Information for Pregnant Women and Mothers

Hepatitis C General Information (Fact Sheet)
This resource provides information about hepatitis C infection and is courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hepatitis C: What to Expect When Getting Tested (Fact Sheet)
This resources answers some of the common HCV testing questions and is courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy: Frequently Asked Questions
This resource is courtesy of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.  

HCV: Patient Education Resources
This is a link to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Patient Education Resources page. Resources are available in English and Spanish.


Information for Prenatal Care Providers

Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for Health Professionals
This is a direct link to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Hepatitis C FAQs for Health Professionals. The webpage provides answers to frequently asked questions about hepatitis C.

HCV Guidance: Recommendations for Testing, Managing and Treating Hepatitis C in Pregnancy
This is a link to a testing resource courtesy of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) and the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA).

Recommended Testing Sequence for Identifying Current Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection
This HCV testing flowsheet is courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Interpretation of Results of Tests for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection and Further Actions
This resource provides the interpretations of HCV serologic laboratory results and is courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Information for Pediatric Providers

Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for Health Professionals
This is a direct link to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Hepatitis C FAQs for Health Professionals. The webpage provides answers to frequently asked questions about hepatitis C.

HCV Guidance: Recommendations for Testing, Managing and Treating Hepatitis C in Children
This is a link to a testing resource courtesy of the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) and the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA).

Guide for Testing Infants and Children Perinatally Exposed to Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection
The Georgia Department of Public Health’s Viral Hepatitis Program developed this resource as a guide for pediatric providers that are caring for HCV-exposed infants and children.

 

Additional Resources

Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public
This is a direct link to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public. The webpage provides answers to frequently asked questions about hepatitis C.

Hepatitis C
This is a link to the Georgia Department of Public Health’s hepatitis C webpage.

Reporting Hepatitis C to the Georgia Department of Public Health
Hepatitis C is a reportable condition in Georgia and must be reported to public health within 7 days of laboratory confirmation. 
 


Page last updated 8/8/2019